TL;DR

Are you tired of Google Chrome eating up all your memory, or making your computer fan turn like a jet engine? Do you get lost in all the tabs that are opened in your browser? Do you always feel stressed when closing your browser because there are several open tabs with websites that took you hours to find and are still needed for some of your pending tasks? Then you might be lucky because with the Sidekick browser I found a solution to all of those issues.

Once upon a time …

… during the second browser war, I was already a converted Mozilla Firefox…


Photo by Teguh Baskoro on Unsplash

TL;DR

This post shows how to use a Raspberry Pi to build an audio receiver supporting Bluetooth streaming, AirPlay, Spotify Connect and, UPnP.

Upgrading your old HiFi system

So many of us still have this old HiFi system, that did cost a fortune back in the time but isn’t used so often anymore since we mostly stream music from Spotify, Soundcloud, Mixcloud, Youtube, and other streaming platforms. What if I told you there is an easy way to give your HiFi system an upgrade by reusing that Raspberry pi which is getting dusty somewhere between your other tech gadgets.

Surely, one could also just buy a…


Photo by Vishnu Mohanan on Unsplash

TL;DR

There are multiple ways of building ARM docker images and there is not always a need to have an ARM computer or server in place to do so. Using QEMU ARM architecture can also be emulated on a normal AMD64 computer or laptop. Only when having to compile a lot of packages on ARM, the best advice is to not use emulation since it will take forever. Also, it is always important to keep in mind which ARM platform to target, be it armv6l, armv7l or aarch64.

Why build ARM Docker images?

With the rise of the Raspberry Pi and its evolution from a weak…


CODEX

Photo by Jay Heike on Unsplash

TL;DR

This blog post is the fourth of four posts about restic, a simple, beautiful, and extremely versatile file backup solution. In this post I will show real-life examples on how to recover forgotten snapshots, mounting the whole repository to a server, changing repository encryption password, and self-updating the installed restic version.

The restic blog post series

Restic Backup I — Simple and beautiful backups
Restic Backup II — In action
Restic Backup III — How to setup
Restic Backup IV — Real-life examples (this post)

Forgotten snapshots

If you accidentally “forgot” a snapshot by using the following command:

There is still hope to restore data from…


CODEX

Photo by Matthew Waring on Unsplash

TL;DR

This blog post is the third of four posts about restic, a simple, beautiful, and extremely versatile file backup solution. In this post, I will guide you through a very basic setup of restic backup including a self-hosted Minio S3 server.

The restic blog post series

Restic Backup I — Simple and beautiful backups
Restic Backup II — In action
Restic Backup III — How to setup (this post)
Restic Backup IV — Real-life examples

The setup

My aim is to show how restic can be used in a practical example. For simplicity I did set up everything on a Raspberry Pi, meaning the backup repository remains…


CODEX

See restic in action

TL;DR

This blog post is the second of four posts about restic, a simple, beautiful, and extremely versatile file backup solution. I show how restic looks like in action give a brief overview of its core functions such as backing up, handling tasks on the backup repo, finding the right files, and restoring them.

The restic blog post series

Restic Backup I — Simple and beautiful backups
Restic Backup II — In action (this post)
Restic Backup III — How to setup
Restic Backup IV — Real-life examples

Restic in action

People that are used to work with the command line in Linux will feel very familiar when using…


CODEX

restic — Backups done right!

TL;DR

This blog post is the first of four posts about restic, a simple, beautiful, and extremely versatile file backup solution written in Go. It is very easy to install and configure and just works pretty neat out of the box. Even though restic backup is not for everyone, I quickly fell in love with its simplicity and enjoy the peace of mind it gives me when using it for backing up my Linux servers.

The restic blog post series

Restic Backup I — Simple and beautiful backups (this post) Restic Backup II — In action Restic Backup III — How to setup Restic Backup IV…


CODEX

Customized Zsh shell

TL;DR

This blog post is about my findings from my personal transition from Bash to Zsh and describes how I got auto-completion for some small tools such as SSH config files and Git to work correctly and how I gave my new Zsh the look and feel of a modern shell using starship cross-shell prompt.

End of an era

Every macOS user that uses the Terminal on a regular basis might at some point have come across the message that introduced the end of the Bash era when upgrading from macOS Mojave to Catalina.


CODEX

Ulauncher application launcher for Linux

TL;DR

Ulauncher empowers Linux users with a powerful application launcher that works pretty much like Spotlight on macOS and Gnome sushi enables a simple preview functionality in Nautilus as we can find it in macOS’ Finder. This article shows you how everything is set up to get you going.

Powerful little helpers

The ones of you working with macOS know about its powerful little helpers that make working with it fast and enjoyable. Anyway, two of the very powerful helpers called Spotlight and Quick Look (space preview) do have their pendant in Linux but only a few people really know about it. …


CODEX

Sidekick browser

TL;DR

This guide not only works for Sidekick browser but might also be helpful for other browsers that do not benefit from the directly supported KeePassXC browser integration. The principle is the same for macOS, Linux, and Windows, only the file paths can vary.

  1. Install the KeePassXC browser integration from Google chrome store.
  2. Activate the browser integration in KeePassXC for Google Chrome (Settings Icon -> Browser Integration (Sidebar) -> (Check) Google Chrome -> Ok).
  3. Copy the “org.keepassxc.keepassxc_browser.json” file from the Google Chrome NativeMessagingHosts folder to the sidekick NativeMessagingHosts.
  4. Restart sidekick and connect browser integration with.

Sidekick Browser

For the once, asking what the…

Remo Hoeppli

Remo Höppli is co-founder and software engineer at Earlybyte. He is a technology enthusiast and minimalism advocate striving for simplicity and efficiency.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store